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Voyeurism in the Philippines only hit political attention last July 27, 2009. Although, this act of personality assassination begun spreading in public even before the declaration of this Republic Act 9995.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMSAcPzM_mw&feature=related

As early as 2007, BITAG means TRAP is an investigative and public service program hosted by Mr. Ben Tulfo already tackled and exposed this issue of voyeurism in the Philippines. However, the government, congress and senate officials never gave this kind of scandal a proper attention. BITAG host Mr. Ben Tulfo quoted the reason why,

“Victims who seek justice are ordinary citizen or what the society called, so-so or nobody citizen”.

This issue only draws attention to both media and political bodies when the victim and accused are both public figure. Media and politicians want to ride on with the popularity of the issue. The Katrina and Hayden sex video scandal somehow help a lot for the Philippine congress to pass the Bill, penalizing the accused and giving justice to the victims.

Thank you is not the right words to say. But, if the sex video that leaked on the net is not owned by a celebrity, this kind of demoralizing women won’t be given justification till date. Thanks to all the women who fearlessly exposed, to Mr. Ben Tulfo for giving a quick action and keeping this issue alive through media.

Nevertheless, thanks for the Republic Act 9995.

Yes, this will ensure the rights of every citizen’s privacy especially women as the main subject.

Republic Act 9995

An Act Defining and Penalizing the Crime of Photo and Video Voyeurism

-The act of taking photo or video coverage of a person or a group of persons performing sexual act or anything similar /without the latter’s consent. Copying, reproducing, broadcasting, sharing, showing or exhibiting (please read full details with the attached link below)

Penalty of:

Imprisonment of not less than 3 years and not more than 7 years, plus a fine of not less than One Hundred thousand pesos but not more than Five Hundred thousand pesos ($2,273.36 up to $11,368.80)

Source:

http://www.lawphil.net/statutes/repacts/ra2010/ra_9995_2010.html