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Brazil is on a roll and awash with confidence that it is set to become one of the 21st Century next superpower. But before it gets there, it will need to do a lot of house cleaning. Specially getting rid of its parasitic Ruling Elite. Read on…

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Friday, November 13, 2009.

– Brazil Getting it together…at last — Not so fast!

It’s glorious, illuminating and downright thrilling to witness the tremendous period of growth Brazil has been experiencing as of late.

Brazil; a country of its magnitude and potential should have been made a massive world-power a century ago. But unfortunately for Brazil, its path toward crowing glory and respect in the world scene, have thwarted and its potential held hostage to the caprices of a perennial and parasitic ruling elite. As is common to all special interest groups, this small elite – which amounts to only the ten percent of the population – are still the class which controls ninety percent of the countries’ vast wealth and resources …the same class that has stifled its growth and hindered its social and economic development. Even with the great many miraculous improvements in Brazil’s economy and its growing notoriety that’s making business leaders, investors and politicians pay attention, Brazil’s  self-serving, parasitical, ruling and social elite is as embryonic as ever, and throughout Brazil’s history, it has been a group that grabs power all for its own, usurp the countries resources and share among themselves, while at the same time it demeans the rest of the countries population – relegating them to sub-human status – and keeping them uneducated, indigenous and locked in the sub-existent corners of Brazil enormous potential. Thus making the underclass their permanent servants and subjects of the upper-class socially imposed economic, cultural, social and ethnic apartheid. Proof to that is the ‘Rio de Janeiro’s 1000 Slums – a picture conveniently left out of Brazil’s successful bid for the 2016 Rio Olympics – present to this day, continues all across Brazil major economic centers. Most of Brazil’s ruling class – although intellectually inefficient themselves – often gets a kick out of the economic and social inferiority of most people among Brazil’s vast population, preferring to keep them out of the party, and or at best, using the poor as modern slaves. That fact is often evident in pop-culture productions of their Novelas (Brazilian Soap Operas) where poor people, more pointedly, the Brazilian so-called ‘Black People’ are considered for or play roles as servants, economic slaves, and at best, they are often tagged or portrayed as criminals, biologically inferior. That attitude stems from real-life mentality of Brazilian ruling society. And it’s often evident in the given brutally of poor and black Brazilians often suffer at the hands of Brazil’s own police, who criminally target and often murder them innocently, no to protect the rights of individuals and uphold the law but to safe-guard the parasitical existence of it’s ruling social and political elite. One could argue that the restless and rampant violent crime threatening Brazil’s growth, its economic development and the safety of visiting World Cup and Olympic fans, is a by-product, if not the unwitting brain-child created by the Brazil’s ruling social elite. To be sure, many young, under-privileged kid in Brazil, when given a fair chance, would rather become a lawyer, doctor, a wealthy business person, a general or a future astronaut. But these perks are still far beyond their reach and for them, in spite Lula’s grand efforts, the doors of opportunities in Brazil remains shut. For most of them, heeding the call of the underworld is the only way out. The merchants of illegal drugs and murder have become their only and trusted option…because they, however nasty the nature of their enterprise, deliver on their words. By contrast, the ruling elite would rather hunker down, when these kids descend from the hills and spread mayhem and fear in the wealthier neighborhoods or Rio and Sao Paulo, in a desperate attempt to grab a bite of the prosperity the wealthy have been eating for so long. The result is often bloody and innocent and bystander get caught in the cross-fire between gangs and the BOPE (Batalhão de Operações Policiais Especiais, Portuguese for Special Police Operations Battalion) the elite special forces unit in the Military Police of the state of Rio de Janeiro created to handle or engage in urban warfare.

Much hoopla has been made about Brazil’s progress and its potential as the next world superpower and much of the ballyhoo has become clear and measurable to some appreciable extent. Yet, on the social level, most of it’s so-called black population, which accounts for almost half of the country population of almost 200 million people, live in poverty or live in crime-infested slums (Favelas) and are largely under-represented in Brazilian society. When one looks at pictures depicting the colors of Brazil and see it boosting in its ethnic diversity, few of the faces you sees are that of black Brazilians. In fact, one need not look further than its own Media industry. On Globo Television -Brazil’s largest and most influence TV Network – for example, one-hundred percent of its news anchors, journalist and staff, are the so-called Brazilian whites. Beyond Globo and the rest of it’s media industry, all you have to do is to move an eye left or right, up or down Brazil’s socio-economic scale to find that from business to cultural to government, Brazilian black faces are largely absent. That gross, under-the-rug socio-economic and ethnic racism is not limited to Brazilian either. Indigenous looking people from the poor North and Northeast of Brazil suffer constant and ongoing discrimination.

President Luiz Inacio da Silva, Brazil’s first working-class president, known around the world as Lula, given that his poor and under-privileged origins, was and is the right man for Brazil. In all fairness, he must be commended for trying to repair these injustices brought upon a large chunk of the Brazilian population. Of course, the parasitical elite would rather get rid of him and if possible, deny, erase or diminish his accomplishments and are surely looking forward to 2011, the year when Lula must step down. That way they can revert that course, reduce Brazil back to its previous status and an underdeveloped nation and gain some of the power they lost during Lula’s consecutive and largely successful administration. Nonetheless, President Lula himself must know that if he wants to truly cement his legacy (as he can and must) he must do a lot more than charm the world or dream of Brazil becoming the world’s 5th economy by 2016 and beyond. For one, he can make the Favelas illegal and un-acceptable in a country such as Brazil and get Petrobras (and it’s pre-sal promises of wealth) Vale, the world’s largest raw-commodity exporter to invest heavily in tearing down the Slums and transform these crime-ridden, disease infested, death-prone areas into economic, social and cultural Oasis. Not to mention, elevating the Favelas dweller’s self-esteem to new heights.

That and that alone, is the only key to get rid of crime in any society and remove the guns and drugs out of the hands of its drug-dealers. More importantly, Brazil must develop a new system for recruitment and accountability for its police force. In other words, it needs to upgrade its selection to make sure criminals aren’t turning into cops -which seems to be the case of Brazil’s police force. Surely there honorable men and women in Brazil who honorably want to serve their nation and put their lives at risk – even as they know they are doing it, mostly to protect the self-serving ruling elite who pays poorly for their services and their sacrifice.

Thus, before Brazil can claim its rightful place among the developed nations of the world, it must use its new-found wealth, vast resources and opportunity to repair and heal its self-inflicted, socio-economic and ethnic wounds. It must prevent its parasitical rulers from regaining power, and encourage its businesses and banking sector, like Banco do Brasil, Itau and all of it’s industrial and educational sector to get involved in investing to bring an equilibrium in the lives of the poorer sectors of its population. The Bolsa Familia, Minha Casa Minha Vida, is a great start in that direction, thanks to president Lula ingenuity. Still, the Brazilian government can do better…and faster. It’s soaring Bovespa, it’s world-beating currency, the Real, it’s Samba enthusiasm, it’s gleaming beaches, its pompous carnival festivities, its capacity to product companies like Embraer – now the world’s largest maker of regional jets, is proof the Brazil is a lucky and blessed nation. And although calling comparing president Lula to Jesus is a bit of a stretch he most certainly deserves to be called Brazil’s savior.

But before living office, president Lula must pass a law making higher educational mandatory priority and he wishes to see office Brazil at the forefront of South Americas’ and the world technological advancement. And since Brazil didn’t have a Civil Right Movement as in North America, make sure that discrimination of any kind and denial of education to an individual based on ethnicity and social profile, be made a violation of the person’s individual rights and make it punishable by law.

Doing that will ensure the future of Brazil and its people and at that, put Brazil not as the 5th largest economy in the world but as the first.

At the moment, as it would appear, Brazil has the way and the means to accomplish a total overhaul of its economic and social infrastructure.

All it need is to have the will.

By Sam Paris

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