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Tarbu had originally been rescued from an animal trader, in 1957, in Tanzania in 1957 and was well known for being very vocal – so much so that on each occasion Mrs Morgan left the house he uttered Cheerio, bye, see you soon.

In what has to be one of the most poignant stories of the week – believed to be the oldest, at around 55 years of age, domestic parrots known of – African Grey parrot Tarbu finally went to his heavenly perch, having uttered his final farewell to owner 89 year-old Nina Morgan as she made her way to bed the night before.

She tearfully recalled how her beloved pet was so weak next morning that he could not even manage his usual morning greeting – Hello, my darling – and fell from his perch, lifeless, after a very full, long life being spoilt by being allowed to munch his favourite Kit-Kat chocolate wafer bars and watch TV.

Tarbu had originally been rescued from an animal trader, in 1957, in Tanzania in 1957 and was well known for being very vocal – so much so that on each occasion Mrs Morgan left the house he uttered Cheerio, bye, see you soon. He was also prone to pronouncing miaow, miaow at passing cats and woof, woof at dogs.

This incredible bird – somehow aware of her deafness – would even alert Mrs Morgan to the doorbell as she could often not hear it. The old lady

lives alone, and was very upset at the loss of her companion for 55 years, who was, she tearfully said a very intelligent bird who was never taught to talk but picked everything up by himself.

The morning he died, I knew, because both of his wings were hanging down, and the fact that he could utter only squeaks was very bad indeed, and after going to make a brew I returned to find him dead on the cage floor. The poor woman wept inconsolably for several days, after a lifetime of companionship with her feathered friend.

 

Tarbu had originally been removed, as a chick, from the nest in Da es Salam in Tanganyika, now Tanzania, by an African trader, before he sold the bird to former flight engineer Mrs Morgan – her husband Peter, piloted for president Julius Nyerere -  for 8 year-old son Christopher in 1955, the boy dying in an RTA in the 70s.

Mrs Morgan returned to England with Tarbu in 1985, and when her beloved husband passed away due to emphysema, the bird became her life companion, who every afternoon would fly around the living room before perching beside her.

Apparently, everyone who met Tarbu thought him a wonderful bird, always doing something and entertaining people with his sharp wit and clever tongue. In memory of her RAF husband, Mrs Morgan buried the old bird beneath an RAF flag, after his death three weeks ago in her garden. What a sad end to such an inspiring story.