U.S. Daily COVID-19 Case Count Reaches Peak Since July Amid Fall Surge

 

Amidst the recent surge in new coronavirus cases across the U.S. due to the fall season, a total of at least 69, 000 new coronavirus cases were reported Friday, marking the highest number recorded in a day since July. According to expert, this significantly marks the fall surge.

With many states adding thousand of new cases, the country recorded its highest numbers in July with over 77, 000 peak daily case count. The number declined later the same month to 71, 300 on July 29. By mid-September, the summer surge had further declined, leaving the average daily case count in the U.S. at a little above 36, 000.

However, the country is recording a reverse as of now. There has been an increase of 14% when compared to the previous week with an average of 53, 000 new COVID-19 cases.

This alarming rise has pushed leaders in the states to employ new guidelines to contain the recent spread.

According to Gov. Andy Beshear, the state government has ordered authorities to intensify enforced mask usage in Kentucky early October. This week, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham declared 10 p.m. closing time for establishments serving alcohol and upscaled limitations on mass gathering.

The director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr Francis Collins, voiced his concerning the possible surge in the number of coronavirus deaths given the soaring number of hospitalizations.

Dr Collin further advised the populace to be concerned about the current rise and to begin thinking about measures to curtail the predicted surge as the season progresses.

Since the outbreak of the pandemic, more than 8 million people have contracted the virus, with over 218, 000 who have died from the disease.

Sadly, projections from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation show that more than 2,300 Americans could be dying daily by mid-January. The researchers further stated that by February 1, the number of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. may be well over 389,000.

Experts, however, noted that the situation could still be salvaged if simple public health measures are adhered to.